Peregrinate @ Modern Art Museum Gebrekirstos Desta Center

A photograph exhibition entitled: “Peregrinate” will be presented on May 19 at Modern Art Museum Gebrekirstos Desta Center.

Peregrinate features the work of three photographers: South Africans Thabiso Sekgala and Musa Nxumalo, and Kenyan Mimi Cherono Ng’ok. The exhibition explores the concept of photography as a common method of investigation, discovery and representation – an act of wandering undertaken by the photographer as traveler and explorer. Jointly curated by the featured photographers, this exhibition is the final stage for the three participants as part of the Goethe-Institut portfolio workshop.

Traversing Soweto streets, backyards in Nairobi, dusty Jordanian alleys, Peregrinate invites viewers to consider the intimate politics of home and belonging, as well as the possibilities inherent in dislocation, or a lack of anchoring, and the routes one takes to find a way. Subtitled ‘field notes on time travel and space’, the exhibition examines notions of spatial politics, the economics of time and travel, and the kinds of access granted to travelers.

Addis International Film Festival to kick off

The 10th edition of the Addis International Film Festival is to be launched on May 4 at the Italian Cultural Institute, Hager Fikir Theatre and Serawit Cinema. More than 60 documentaries will be screened from May 4-10.

Organized by Initiative Africa Films— a company that raises socially relevant issues— the films will be screened followed by discussions with the filmmakers. One of the films that will be screened during this occasion is entitled: “The Black Panthers”.  Change was coming to America and the fault lines could no longer be ignored—cities were burning. Vietnam was exploding, and disputes raged over equality and civil rights. A new revolutionary culture was emerging and it sought to drastically transform the system. The Black Panther party for self-defense would for a short time, put itself at the vanguard of that change. The other critical film of the America’s prison system is “Guantanamo’s Child”. The other films include “Terror”, “Cartel Land”, “Chuck Norris vs. Communism” and “How to Change the World”.

Mahmoud Ahmed’s 75th birthday @ Yared Music School

The legendary Ethiopian musician Mahmoud Ahmed 75th birthday is going to be celebrated on May 5 at Yared Music School. The renowned vocalist’s birthday celebration will take place on the first week of May at various locations showcasing the long and memorable musical odyssey of Mahmoud Ahmed. During the occasion there will be various entertainment events and photographic display of his historic timeline. Renowned with his songs such as Tizita, Mela Mela, Alawokshilgim and Teresash Woy, Mahmoud is endowed with a gift that is able to transcend the generation gap.  Born in Addis Ababa Mercato area he pursued music at an early age and is still persistent in pushing after four decades of stay in music. Coming from a humble background, his professional music career started while he was hanging out at Emperor Haileselassie’s Imperial Bodyguard Band after performances. With an electric stage performance and unique talent, it only took him a short time to catch people’s ear.

“Field of Dreams” launched  

A poetry compilation book entitled “Field of Dreams” was launched on April 24 at Hilton Hotel. This compilation is the works of the poet Lulit Kebede. Classified in three parts namely “Color of Days”, “Ribbon of the Heart” and the title “Field of Dreams”, it consists of more than 100 poetry pieces.

Some of her poems include “Abyssinian Girl”, “For the Sake of the Mothers”,” Loving Eyes” and “Humble Spirits”. Unique to Ethiopian poetry scene, Lulit writes in English issues that touch her.

According to the written statement on the cover of “Field of Dreams”, the poet tries to reminisce her childhood dreams and imagination. “What if the world be the dream we all dream to be? Remember the good old days while we were kids. We used to have those dreams we never wanted to wake up from,” Lulit describes all the dreams children had, the joy they had and the fairytales they believed in.

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